Pretty house with double glazing

Double glazing has been a feature of our homes for more than 40 years now and it is pretty rare to see a home that doesn’t already have it. But there are some and they may have decided to keep their single glazing for very good reasons. Perhaps they:

  • Live in a conservation area and must have expensive double glazing units such as sashes that they can’t afford. Many homes in conservation areas are more than 100 years old and will have sash type windows. These would need to be replaced like for like and this can be more expensive.
  • Work hard to maintain the wood, paint it every year and regularly treat it so their windows are in good shape. Wooden windows need regular maintenance and should be filled, sanded and painted at least every few years. If the wood starts to rot, your window panes could simply fall out.
  • Live in a listed home and simply are not allowed to change the windows. Some properties are not allowed to have double glazing units, but could have replacement wooden units that would be better. You would

The rules set out by your Council

Will I need planning permission?

In almost all cases the answer to this is yes because extension work carried out on a flat does not come under Permitted Development. Permitted development essentially states that work carried out on a house that extends it by a set amount does not require Planning Permission. But when it comes to flats the rules are different and planning is almost always needed.

This is especially the case if your flat is part of a listed building or is in a conservation area. In fact if you start work on a building that has special historical character without permission you could be committing a criminal offence. So checking with your planning office is essential before you do anything.

Why do I need Planning Permission?

The main reasons for flat extensions needing planning permission is the fact that your neighbours will inevitably be affected, due to their proximity to your property. Not only will the your property and the extension impact on their property, but the work being carried out will affect their day to day living. Noise, mess, parking issues and people in

External wall materials for new house

The building of an extension is certainly going to alter the way that you home looks and part of that process is adding external walls that work with the existing structure, but also possibly changing the existing wall cladding to give a more attractive overall look. In most cases your exterior walls will be exempt from planning permission, but there are cases where planning will be required.

  • If you live in a listed building or in a conservation area you will almost certainly need planning permission
  • If you want to clad your new or existing walls with stone, pebble dash, render, tiles or plastic and you live in an area of outstanding beauty or a national park you will need to apply
  • In all other cases you still need to ensure the cladding or wall covering you choose must be in keeping with the existing style

Building regulations

Changing the look of the outside walls of your home may not always need building regulations approval – but the addition of new external walls as part of your extension probably will. Building regulations use a set of rules to determine

Tiling With The Colour Of The Year: Heart Wood

The colour of the year for 2018 has been revealed so don’t be surprised if you start to see plenty of Heart Wood cropping up in the interiors world. Heart Wood is a gorgeous colour that combines purple, mauve with some softer brown undertones. This beautifully rich colour is perfect for all year round offering a cosy warmth in the winter and a fresh contemporary look come summer. With this set to be next years hottest colour, how can you incorporate Heart Wood when it comes to tiling you kitchen or bathroom?

The colour of Heart Wood has a very neutral base meaning that it can be paired harmoniously with beiges and creams for a softer and delicate design. This makes it ideal for Scandinavian aesthetics as it emotes a calm and peaceful atmosphere. Similarly, the muted and warm undertones of Heart Wood make it ideal for Hygge interiors as well.

Tips To Getting A Scandi Home

If you’re looking for a neutral home with a hint of industrial chic, than the Scandi look is perfect. Having taken off massively in the past few years, Scandi homes have become a staple piece with homeowners thanks to its neutral tones. Think exposed woods and distressed furniture coupled with soft accessories for a stark contrast between cosy and stylish. The Scandi look is perfect throughout the whole home, but works particularly well in rooms like lounges and bedrooms where you are most likely to kick back and relax. A great way of starting your journey towards a Scandi home is with a rug. Rugs offer that beautiful texture and warmth that the Scandi look requires.

Colour

As previously mentioned, the core colour palette to follow is that of neutral tones. This comes from the minimalism ethos of the Scandi design. This doesn’t mean you need everything in your home to be white, instead think of using a mix of creams, browns and even delicate greys that have warmer purple undertones. This muted

Winter Floors

With Summer officially over it’s time to think about the colder months, the darker nights and maybe the heating bill! So how can you prepare your home ahead of Winter? Well, there are certain interior design tips that can help make your home feel a bit cosier during the latter end of the year. The first step should always be the foundation of your home; the flooring. But how do you achieve a warmer look from the floor alone? The key thing to achieve is a perception of a warmer temperature in the room, with that in mind it pays to stay away from lighter boards as they can create a cold and airy feel in the room. Darker, richer colours will help to inject that warm and cosy feel into your living room…

Rustic/Natural Grade Floors

This style of flooring has proven incredibly popular over recent years and it’s not hard to see why. There’s something really charming about natural and rustic grade floors, they ooze character and can help bring a real country feel. This type of flooring  can immediately transform any room that it

The perfect sun rooms

Within certain parameters it is possible to spend almost as much or as little on your conservatory as you want. It entirely depends on your budget, the look and specifications you are going for and the size that you would like. The options are almost endless and the extras you can add can push up the price significantly – even after the initial build is done. So getting to the average conservatory price is tricky, but it is certainly possible to estimate based on your particular needs.

 

Low budget conservatory

If you don’t have much money to spend and are handy with a drill and spade you can buy an off the shelf conservatory for around £2,500 from any one of the larger High Street DIY stores. This does not include the ground works which will involve digging out foundations and preparing a concrete base. You should allow a few hundred more to do this. But to get you to a basic stage you could certainly have your conservatory in place for less than £4,000.

 

Standard conservatories

Most companies will quote around £6,000 to £10,000 for a standard conservatory that fits into their bulk window size ranges. If you can keep it under the

Are you looking for a new front door

Your front door is the first impression that you get to make when someone visits your home, which means that many of us want to choose the most attractive door possible, to cast your house in the best light. Should you however be basing your choice on how the door looks, rather than how it performs? The short answer is no, because choosing a front door purely on looks, might be something you regret in the long term when it fails to meet it’s functional requirements. We’ve put together some guidelines below on how to buy buy the best exterior doors for your home, to help you to choose a door that will meet your practical as well as aesthetic needs.

 

Material

This factor is probably the most important of all considerations when buying your new door. While a solid wood door may look lovely you should be aware that if it gets wet, it is at risk of swelling and then subsequently shrinking as it dries out. A well designed and professionally fitted door will need to be carefully installed to ensure that the gap between your door and it’s frame is a consistent size, ensuring a snug but not tight

Combi boilers is need on you home

If your home doesn’t already have a combi boiler, you may have considered replacing your current boiler for one – especially if you have heard good things about them. But do you really understand the full benefits? Here is the definitive list of reasons to buy a combi-boiler.

 

No need to store hot water

A combi boiler eliminates the need to have any storage of hot water and so you can get rid of that hot water tank that is taking up space in your loft or hallway cupboard. This can free up the space for other things. Pipework and cold water storage is also minimised.

 

Small unit

A combi boiler is usually a smaller and more compact unit so it can easily fit inside your kitchen cupboards. This more streamlined look makes it a more attractive option for smaller kitchens.

 

Incredibly efficient

A combi boiler is highly efficient – you are only heating water as and when you need it, so this will save you money in the long run. Combi-boilers are usually A-rated and will therefore offer huge monetary savings compared to any boiler than is more than 10 years old. It is estimated you could save up to £300 per year by replacing

Double glazing for your home is great ideas

There are so many reasons to get double glazing: the improvement in energy efficiency, the better looking home, the lowered maintenance and improved home value. But some homeowners are still a little reluctant to take the plunge and invest in double glazing perhaps because of the myths that they may have heard. If you have been put off buying double glazing, take a look at the following and see if we can put your mind at rest.

 

You need planning permission

The only time you will need to get planning permission for double glazing is if your home is listed or you live in a conservation area. In this case you should speak to planning officers, but an actual planning application may still not be necessary. You should also speak to the leaseholder if you live in a flat.

 

White UPVC windows go yellow eventually

The new style of UPVC windows use much better technology than the older ones and therefore are designed to retain their colour. This high quality material will stay white (as long as you keep them clean!)

 

Double glazed windows are more easily broken into

Some double glazed units are built with the beading on the outside allowing would-be burglars to pop

The reason of home improvements can be so expensive

But they are much cheaper than moving house. With estate agents charging anywhere from 1% to 5% of the sale price of your home and stamp duty a huge chunk of money, the cost of moving house can easily reach above £10,000. For that you can have a small house extension, a new kitchen and bathroom or a new conservatory or garden room. Even if you need to add to your mortgage, at today’s interest rates the cost is very low.

 

The planning process is so long

But planning permission is not always needed. In the vast majority of cases you won’t need to apply for planning permission at all. As long as your extension, loft conversion or conservatory is within permitted development for your area then you can carry on without telling anyone (except for building control). The rules may be different if your home is listed or in a conservation area so always do your homework, but for that extra space you need the process could be very simple. If you do need planning most councils will approve within 12 weeks, so not a huge amount of time to wait.

 

There are so many cowboy builders out there

But there are many

Consultation Scheme

The vast majority of conservatories and small extensions built these days will not require planning permission due to the permitted development rules. However those that are larger than average will need to go through the planning permission process. To give a little more breathing space to builders and homeowners the government has introduced the Neighbour Consultation Scheme in a bid to allow larger extensions without the need for planning.

The Neighbour Consultation Scheme was introduced as a sort of interim measure for rear extensions to be built that are larger than those currently allowed under permitted development, but without homeowners needing to get full planning permission. It is in place for a period of six years only from 2013 and work must be completed by 30 May 2019.

Size restrictions

The current permitted development rules state that rear extensions can be up to 4m – but these new rules have doubled that to 8m for detached houses and from 3 to 6m for terraces and semi detached buildings. Obviously this applies to homes where no extensions have previously been built.

The maximum height is 4m and maximum eaves height must be a maximum of 3m if the construction is within 2m of the property

The caused internal damp problems

When you had your cavity wall insulation installed, you probably were excited about all the benefits. After all, the Energy Saving Trust suggests that you could save as much as £275 a year on your energy bills from having this type of work carried out. But has it become a nightmare for you because of damp issues? If so, you are probably wondering what on earth you can do to correct the problem. Millions of people are discovering that the insulation they had installed (often free of charge under government schemes), in the hope of reducing energy costs, are actually now having the exact opposite effect, causing damp and mould problems.

 

How can wall cavity insulation cause damp?

First of all, it’s worth noting that not all damp problems are caused by faulty cavity wall insulation, and equally not all cavity wall problems will end up causing you issues with damp. Despite the fact that most people’s cavity wall insulation will continue to provide them with energy and efficiency savings over it’s lifetime, unfortunately some installations can result in serious damp problems.

Cavity wall insulation is designed to do one thing; to insulate the cavity in your wall. Insulation material is pumped into

Planning permission for a garden wall

When you decide to build an extension on your home there’s a very good chance that there may be additional garden landscaping work that will need to be completed, to fit in with the change of shape. In particular you will want to erect a fence or wall between your home and your neighbours that will accommodate the new addition. In most cases planning permission won’t be required, but there are some circumstances where you should double check with your council.

You may/will need Planning Permission if:

Your fence, gate or wall will be more than 1 metre high and is next to the road or footpath.
Your fence is over 2 metres high and is erected anywhere on your property.
Your deeds suggest that you are not allowed to erect fences, gates or walls on your property.
You live in a listed house or in a conservation area.
The fence, wall or gate shares a boundary with any other property that happens to be listed.

What if i just want to remove a fence or wall?

Planning Permission is not needed for the removal of walls or fences or for when you are replacing those that are already there. But you must not

Planning an extension for your house

Enhancing your home with a new extension is a great idea, but you might want to take the opportunity to make it even better by adding solar panels to the roof. After all, you will now have a large space that needs to be heated and more roof space to accommodate the panels. Doing it all at the same time can be a great idea and even save you money in the long run.

For the most part solar panels do not need Planning Permission, but you may find that your home is subject to some of the restrictions that currently exist regarding the installation of solar panels on the roof. These restrictions are as follows:

  • The solar panels should be positioned so that they do not have a visual impact on the area or the external appearance of the building. Ideally this means putting them on the back of the house
  • The panels should be removed when no longer required
  • The panels cannot protrude further than 200mm from the roof slope and cannot be installed any higher than the highest part of the roof (but not on the chimney!)
  • Panels cannot be installed on a listed building or within the grounds of a listed

Avoid wall house problems

In recent years, due to government campaigns and free offers, more and more homeowners have been having wall cavity insulation added to their homes. In most cases this is a welcome addition that can save a homeowner as much as £275 per year according to the Energy Saving Trust. But in some cases, it has been shown to cause damp and mould problems and it may even need to be removed.

What is cavity wall insulation?
Most homes are constructed with exterior walls that have a gap between the outer brick and the inner block. This air gap can promote heat loss from the inside and wall cavity insulation is designed to fill this space. Usually an insulation material is pumped into the space – a job that should be done by experts to ensure that it no gaps are left and that your home is suitable.

Does wall cavity insulation cause damp problems?
Not always, but if it has been incorrectly fitted or your home is not suitable, it can lead to problems. The consumer company Which? carried out an investigation into wall cavity insulation problems a few years ago and they discovered that some homes are not suitable, but that

Buying a House Near Fracking Sites

In a new survey commissioned by House-Extension.co.uk, and conducted by OnePoll, it has been revealed that up to 64% of homeowners would be less likely to buy a house, if it was situated near a fracking site. This is perhaps not that surprising, as proximity to infrastructure developments such as power stations have always been a consideration for house buyers. With news this week that the government has overturned Lancashire County Councils rejection of an application by Cuadrilla to setup a fracking operation, it looks as though Fracking could well be here to stay, with more applications underway for new sites across the country.

In the survey conducted by OnePoll, on behalf of this website, 1,000 respondents across the UK were asked if they would ever consider buying a house near a fracking site, and whether they were for or against fracking if it reduced their energy bills.

Over 64% of respondents said that they would be reluctant to buy a home near a fracking site. In response to the question, 21% said that they were somewhat unlikely to consider buying a home near a fracking site, and 43% stated that they were very unlikely to do so.

When looking into the ages

Biomass planning requirements

When it comes to renewable energy, biomass is one of the most efficient and energy saving options you can choose. You can choose a system that will both heat your home and provide hot water, all while producing very little carbon into the atmosphere. If you choose to install a system as part of your extension work, you should be aware that there may be some Planning Permission requirements.

What is biomass?

A biomass boiler provides heat to your home via a burner that runs on wood pellets. In some cases this burner can also be used to burn household waste and even food waste. The energy produced is fed into the home where it is used to heat radiators, underfloor heating and hot water. It is incredibly efficient as the carbon produced is less than that absorbed by the tree during its lifetime. In this way it is considered carbon neutral.

Will I need planning?

If the biomass system work is entirely internal and uses existing flues or chimneys, you will most likely not need Planning Permission. If your flues and chimneys meet permitted development rules then you should also be OK. However there are exceptions as follows:

  • If your chimney or flue extends

The age old question about new house

Should I stay or should I go? It’s a common dilemma for homeowners looking to upgrade their living space. On one hand, you could sell up and move to somewhere better, or alternatively spend the money improving your existing house. Should I sell my home and move into the one that best suits my needs, or shall I just improve the home I am in and turn it into my dream home? It really is a tricky one and not least because there are pros and cons on both sides. You need to consider a huge range of questions before making this choice and the answer may still not be clear.

The question has been even further complicated by the recent vote in the UK to leave the EU and its somewhat unknown effect on house prices. The Nationwide reported recently that house prices saw a slight rise of 0.5% in July 2016, but that they felt that the EU decision could reduce demand overall. This rise compares to more than 5% in the previous year. If house prices were to fall this could seriously affect your choice about whether to sell or improve.

The pros and cons of selling

  • If house prices

Kingspan under floor insulation

When there is winter and snowfall there is a necessity for the room heating system. Whatever heating system is put there is a good effect if there is insulation. To increase the effect of the under floor heating system it is better to use Kingspan under floor insulation.

Not only the floor but the whole room is warm with this insulation. The consumption of electricity is reduced to get lesser utility bills. This insulation gives a good performance. It is fiber free and thermoset insulation. This rigid core has the foil of low-emissivity insulating coating on both the sides. The insulation is for the concrete on one side and the suspending ground on the other.

  • Heat Resistant and Does Not Allow Heat to Pass-through

Thermal insulation is the property used for warming the room quickly. It has the capacity to resist the compression of normal foot traffic. It is light weight helping to handle it easily while installation. The material used is rot resistant as it is in between the layers of concrete and ground. There are different thicknesses of insulation available in the market. It is better if the thickness of insulation is more. The engineers decide the type of insulation necessary